Home

AT&F Large Metal Fabrication

and the ability to do more with big metal with large capacity equipment that pushes the limits of size, scope and precision.

home-arrow

AT&F Advanced Metals Fabrication

designs, fabricates and inspects process equipment for corrosive environments
using specialty metals.

home-arrow

AT&F Fabricating Around the World

with strategic locations throughout the United States, Europe and India
to serve our international client base.

home-arrow

AT&F News

AT&F Fabricator

AT&F is pleased to announce recent upgrades to our Wisconsin facility, including a brand new plasma and oxy-fuel cutting table with a 5-axis beveling head, and improvements to a large capacity boring bar. In addition to the equipment upgrades, AT&F Wisconsin is pleased to announce the addition of a Certified Weld Inspector (CWI) to further enhance the welding quality and provide a valuable resource for proper procedures and training. These upgrades are part of AT&F’s continuous improvement initiative and bolster the Wisconsin facility’s capabilities for a competitive market.

Posted: January 9, 2017, 2:28 pm

When a welding job requires precision, the obvious method to use is TIG welding. Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is a welding method using tungsten as an electrode and argon or helium gas as a shielding agent. When GTAW was first introduced in 1941, it used exclusively helium as the shielding gas. This gave it its original name: Heli arc welding. It is now referred to as tungsten inert gas welding, or TIG for short. It is a slow and difficult method to master, but a trained welder can use TIG welding to produce very high quality welds. But what makes TIG welding so precision oriented? And why do TIG welders have to feed the wire by hand?

Posted: January 5, 2017, 1:37 pm

For millennia, metals have been manipulated to man’s wants and needs. But from primitive hammers and anvils to high-tech robotic lasers, man’s methods of manipulation have changed and evolved drastically over time. The impact of advancements in welding has built skyscrapers, automobiles, and even nuclear reactors, but the genesis of welding looked nothing like the advanced technology we have at our disp
osal today. Paving the way for modern structures and safer machines, welding plays a crucial role in our daily lives.

Posted: December 21, 2016, 4:48 pm

Welding is a ubiquitous method of metalworking that joins two pieces of metal together to form a strong bond. But what exactly happens when the two metals join together? By definition, welding joins two pieces of metal by fusion. In order to properly fuse together, the base metal must melt and flow together. Older welding methods would employ an oxyfuel blowtorch to heat pieces of metal until the base metals reached melting temperature, but newer methods now use an electric arc to generate the heat necessary to melt the metal. The arc is created when an electric charge is passed from an electrode to the workpieces. The electrode is usually consumable and charged either negatively or positively depending on the desired character of the weld. A proper weld often creates a bond between workpieces that is stronger than the original strength of the workpieces themselves.

Posted: December 8, 2016, 8:30 pm

Share Button